Gastroenterology Practice Chesapeake, Norfolk, Va. Beach | GI MDS
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Gastro FAQ

Why can’t I drive myself home after a procedure?

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You are not allowed to drive at all the rest of the day after being sedated for a procedure. Even if you think that you feel fine after being sedated for a procedure, it is impossible to tell how your reflexes and thought processes have been impaired by the medication you have been given. If you have an accident, you will test positive for narcotics.

Is beer (or other alcohol) considered a clear liquid?

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No, beer and other alcoholic beverages are not allowed on a clear liquid diet.

Can I drink decaf coffee or tea?

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No, these are not considered ‘clear liquids’.

Can I have a taxi take me home?

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No, you may not have a taxi take you home. You will still be under the effects of the sedative and need someone responsible to care for you. The taxi driver will be unable to give you the care that you need.

Will I have to come in for a consultation visit before the colonoscopy? Why?

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You will need to come in for a consultation visit before the colonoscopy so that the doctor can gather all of your medical history, do a brief physical exam, and go over the appropriate preparation instructions with you.

How will I feel after the procedure?

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Most people feel OK after a colonoscopy. You may feel a bit drowsy. You'll be watched after the procedure as you awaken from the sedation. If you’ve had a colonoscopy, you may have some gas, which could cause mild discomfort.

Will I have a sore throat after the EGD?

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You may have some mild discomfort, or you may not have any discomfort at all. If you have any pain or fever following any procedure, please call the office immediately.

If I am on my period, can I still have the colonoscopy?

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In most cases, yes, you can still have the colonoscopy as long as you are wearing a tampon. If you tend to bleed heavily, you may want to reschedule for another date when you are not menstruating.

Will I be able to resume normal activities the day after the procedure?

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Yes, unless large polyps are removed, in which case, exercise may be limited.

How soon after the procedure can I eat or drink?

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As soon as you are discharged you may eat and drink, unless you need to be NPO for another test. We do suggest you eat light for the rest of the day.

Should I take all of my medications on the morning of the procedure?

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If you are on any blood pressure medication, heart medication, medication for seizures, or psychiatric medications, you should take it on the morning of the procedure. ALL other medications please wait until after your procedure to take.

Am I knocked out completely for the test?

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No, you are not completely “knocked out”; the procedure will be done under conscious sedation. You will usually receive two medications prior to and during the procedure. One of the medications is for pain and the other is to make you feel sleepy and relaxed. You will be conscious for the procedure although you may not remember all of it afterwards.

What kind of sedation is used?

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The type of sedation used is what is known as “conscious sedation”. You will be awake and able to talk and watch the procedure on the video screen, although you may not remember it afterwards.

How long will the procedure take?

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Colonoscopy can take from 30-60 minutes. Endoscopy can take from 15-30 minutes. The procedure can take more or less time and varies from person to person. Even though the test itself takes about 30 minutes, you will need extra time for registration, preoperative check-in, the test itself, and postoperative recovery. The average stay for most patients is about two hours total.

How long will I have to stay after the procedure is over?

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On average, patients are observed for 30-60 minutes after their procedure. After you have stable vital signs, are able to sit up, and are able to ambulate unassisted, you and your companion will be free to leave.

I am afraid that I will say things that I shouldn’t while sedated.

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This is a normal and common fear. Most individuals are afraid of losing control, giving away their secrets, or saying something embarrassing while they are asleep. While in a state of conscious sedation, it is very unusual for patients to speak.

If the doctor finds a polyp during my procedure, will he remove it?

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In most cases, the polyp will be removed and sent to the lab for testing.

Will I mess up the bed while they are doing the procedure?

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No, the scope has a suction to clean out any liquid left in your bowel.

Why should I avoid red liquids during my colonoscopy prep?

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The red color can persist in the colon and potentially look like blood. However, cranberry juice is permitted since it is a natural red color.

Drinking all this liquid makes me feel like vomiting and I don't think that I can drink any more. What do I do?

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It is important that you continue to drink the solution if at all possible. Without a clean bowel, the doctor will not be able to see the inside of your colon to complete the examination. If you experience nausea, wait 15 minutes and resume drinking slowly. If you do vomit, wait 45 minutes and begin drinking the solution again. Try sipping the solution with a straw.

I drank a lot of the solution and I have not gone to the bathroom yet. What should I do?

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Keep drinking. Most people have a bowel movement after an hour. Some patients may take 2 hours or longer.

Can I drink alcoholic beverages?

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Do not drink any alcoholic beverages prior to your procedure since they can cause dehydration.

What side effects may I expect from the colonoscopy prep?

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Since the prep works by flooding the intestinal tract with fluid, abdominal bloating and cramping may occur, as well as some nausea and vomiting. This is usually temporary, and as the diarrhea develops, symptoms will gradually improve. Weakness can also occur, especially if you have not taken enough fluid with the prep, and can be remedied by increasing fluid intake.

Why does your facility not acknowledge Advance Directives?

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This is not as controversial as it might seem. We are not a long-term care facility nor are we a hospital, therefore Advance Directives would not apply to the care received in our office facilities. If something should happen to you in our facility, we will do everything we can to prevent loss of life. Once you are transferred to the hospital, your Advance Directive will then become effective.
 
     
Gastroenterology
 

How to Schedule an Appointment

To schedule an office appointment by phone please call:
(757) 627-6416 Norfolk
(757) 436-3285 Chesapeake

Established patients may request appointments online by visiting our EMR Online Patient Portal.

Physicians may fax requests for appointments and Open Access Colonoscopy to either office:

Fax: (757) 627-3709 Norfolk
Fax: (757) 436-2262 Chesapeake


NORFOLK OFFICE
400 Gresham Drive, Suite 303 Norfolk, VA 23507
Ph: (757) 627-6416 | Billing: (757) 627-9986
Fax: (757) 627-3709
CHESAPEAKE OFFICE
113 Gainsborough Sq., Ste. 100, Chesapeake, VA 23320
Ph: (757) 436-3285 | Billing: (757) 627-9986
Fax: (757) 436-2262
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